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Table of Contents

  1. Introduction: AIACC: Climate Change and Conservation Planning
    1. Chapter1: Evidence for climate change
      1. Chapter 2: Global circulation models
        1. Chapter 4: Biodiversity responses to past changes in climate
          1. Chapter 5: Adaptation of biodiversity to climate change
            1. Slide 1: Adaptation of biodiversity to climate change
            2. Slide 2: Introduction
            3. Slide 3: Adaptation I
            4. Slide 4: Adaptation II
            5. Slide 5: Bringing together conservation planning and climate research
            6. Slide 6: Formation of the current conservation network
            7. Slide 7: Colonial conservation
            8. Slide 8: Features of early conservation
            9. Slide 9: Where were reserves located
            10. Slide 10: Ecoregions of Southern Africa
            11. Slide 11: What constitutes conservation
            12. Slide 12: Mopane woodland
            13. Slide 13: Mopane is more than adequately conserved
            14. Slide 14: Hotspots of biodiversity in South Africa
            15. Slide 15: Southern African bioregions
            16. Slide 16 : Succulent Karoo
            17. Slide 17: Fynbos
            18. Slide 18: Reserves in the fynbos region
            19. Slide 19: Extent of conservation versus "need" for conservation. Two extremes
            20. Slide 20: Reserves in Madagascar
            21. Slide 21: Reserves in other SADC countries
            22. Slide 22: Conserved area in seven Southern Africa countries
            23. Slide 23: Number of parks in seven Southern Africa countries
            24. Slide 24: Contribution of private land to conservation
            25. Slide 25: Old trends
            26. Slide 26 : Pressures on conventional conservation
            27. Slide 27: New trends I
            28. Slide 28: New trends II
            29. Slide 29: Current trends I
            30. Slide 30: Contribution of private land to conservation in South Africa
            31. Slide 31 : Current trends II
            32. Slide 32 : Adaptation responses
            33. Slide 33: Persists or expands
            34. Slide 34: Autonomous adaptation / migration
            35. Slide 35: Facilitated migration
            36. Slide 36: Preservation
            37. Slide 37: Conclusion I
            38. Slide 38: Conclusion II
            39. Slide 39: Test yourself
            40. Slide 40:Links to other chapters
          2. Chapter 6: Approaches to niche-based modelling
            1. Chapter 7: Ecosystem function modelling
              1. Chapter 8: Climate change implications for conservation planning
                1. Chapter 9: The economic costs of conservation response options for climate change
                  1. Course Resources
                    1. Practical: Conservation for Climate Change
                      1. Tests to Assess your Understanding
                        1. How to run a GAM model in R

                          Slide 38: Conclusion II

                          Duration: 00:01:37

                          Notes:

                          Individual biological organisms will have different responses to climate change. Some may well benefit from the change in climate but it is predicted that many other will become extinct as a consequence of climate change. There are a number of management options available and these are likely to be specific to specific organisms. There is a need to configure reserves that don't best conserve the current configuration of biodiversity, but rather that protect gradients and migratory corridors that allow biodiversity to move through the landscape. Environmental gradient protection may well be a key component of such a conservation strategy. In addition there will be a need to intervene to help many of the species. This may be through helping the species translocate through space. New conservation paradigms are needed in the conservation fraternity to think of moving species to areas where they didn't occur in the past. Probably the most important strategy for ensuring the conservation of biodiversity, given a climatically-changing environment, is that areas outside of the reserves must be conserved, or made as biodiversity-friendly as possible. This is not to say that a strategically aligned conservation network that protects conservation given climate change is not important. Rather it is a necessity to expand conservation to as large an area as possible. Many species will have to migrate through areas that aren't covered by the current reserve network. In addition, areas outside of the reserve network may become important refugia for species, as the habitat within the reserves is decreased due to climate change.