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Table of Contents

  1. Introduction: AIACC: Climate Change and Conservation Planning
    1. Chapter1: Evidence for climate change
      1. Chapter 2: Global circulation models
        1. Chapter 4: Biodiversity responses to past changes in climate
          1. Chapter 5: Adaptation of biodiversity to climate change
            1. Slide 1: Adaptation of biodiversity to climate change
            2. Slide 2: Introduction
            3. Slide 3: Adaptation I
            4. Slide 4: Adaptation II
            5. Slide 5: Bringing together conservation planning and climate research
            6. Slide 6: Formation of the current conservation network
            7. Slide 7: Colonial conservation
            8. Slide 8: Features of early conservation
            9. Slide 9: Where were reserves located
            10. Slide 10: Ecoregions of Southern Africa
            11. Slide 11: What constitutes conservation
            12. Slide 12: Mopane woodland
            13. Slide 13: Mopane is more than adequately conserved
            14. Slide 14: Hotspots of biodiversity in South Africa
            15. Slide 15: Southern African bioregions
            16. Slide 16 : Succulent Karoo
            17. Slide 17: Fynbos
            18. Slide 18: Reserves in the fynbos region
            19. Slide 19: Extent of conservation versus "need" for conservation. Two extremes
            20. Slide 20: Reserves in Madagascar
            21. Slide 21: Reserves in other SADC countries
            22. Slide 22: Conserved area in seven Southern Africa countries
            23. Slide 23: Number of parks in seven Southern Africa countries
            24. Slide 24: Contribution of private land to conservation
            25. Slide 25: Old trends
            26. Slide 26 : Pressures on conventional conservation
            27. Slide 27: New trends I
            28. Slide 28: New trends II
            29. Slide 29: Current trends I
            30. Slide 30: Contribution of private land to conservation in South Africa
            31. Slide 31 : Current trends II
            32. Slide 32 : Adaptation responses
            33. Slide 33: Persists or expands
            34. Slide 34: Autonomous adaptation / migration
            35. Slide 35: Facilitated migration
            36. Slide 36: Preservation
            37. Slide 37: Conclusion I
            38. Slide 38: Conclusion II
            39. Slide 39: Test yourself
            40. Slide 40:Links to other chapters
          2. Chapter 6: Approaches to niche-based modelling
            1. Chapter 7: Ecosystem function modelling
              1. Chapter 8: Climate change implications for conservation planning
                1. Chapter 9: The economic costs of conservation response options for climate change
                  1. Course Resources
                    1. Practical: Conservation for Climate Change
                      1. Tests to Assess your Understanding
                        1. How to run a GAM model in R

                          Slide 37: Conclusion I

                          Duration: 00:00:55

                          Notes:

                          A number of conclusions can be drawn from this section. Firstly, current reserve patterns have historic, rather than strategic conservation objectives, and therefore are not well configured to best conserve biodiversity. However, a number of new strategic conservation planning tools are being developed that allow for re-configuring reserves to better conserve biodiversity. These tools however, need to consider the impacts of climate change, and strategic conservation needs to manage for climate change, rather than managing for constant state or trying to manage to past distribution patterns. It is likely that off-reserve conservation needs to be a critical component of this strategy, in other words what we have termed matrix management. One of the ways of achieving this is devolution of ownership of user rights, in other words making it worthwhile for the farmer to conserve biodiversity.